Get Sensational Attention Video RELEASED

KIDS and TEACHERS Versions

In school we want “Eyes up here. Ears up here.” Attention deficient is the most common challenge for children today but their bodies are telling us why. Difficulty controlling behavior, feeling hyperactive and needing to move are signs to what is causing attention deficient. It’s the sensation in their bodies.

Is sensation related to attention? Scientists say “yes.” See http://wellnessthroughmovement.com/blog/(Society for Research in Child Development). Attention negotiates with sensation.

First step is to build awareness of physical presence for the child. Key factors to this type of awareness are attention and movement. This awareness is physical condition and takes practice to learn (three weeks).

There are two videos. The “Kid’s version” of “Getting Sensational Attention” can be viewed into two or three segments. The “Teacher’s version includes the research. Watch the video then ADAPT, ADAPT, ADAPT. Adapt the sensation of “home” to daily situations. How? Ask the children to remember the feeling of “home.” Are they present inside? Repeat the lesson until they can feel how to “home” speak (or listen) from home. And listen. Do they need to share?

In sensation lie the urge to behavior, the curiosity to listening and the ambition to achieving. Help your student become fully present and attention will expand. Grades and social behavior also improve. Teach attention, dual attention both inside and “out there.”

Wellness Through Movement Presents at Research Conference

 

SRCD Teaching Institute Presentation & Brown University Meeting

Screen Shot 2015-04-08 at 2.05.34 PMIMG_1692 - Version 2Catherine Rosasco Mitchell and Carolyn Palmer

 

We got invited to do a poster presentation at the Society for Research for Child Development (SRCD) and Carolyn Palmer, Vassar College researcher and my partner in crime, whispered to me just before our presentation, “I hope someone comes by our poster.”

 

“What?,” my brain scrabbled, “I just traveled halfway around the world for this presentation.”

 

Twenty-two posters were displayed in our session and presenters had an hour and a half to talk to interested spectators. After talking to many people I stood back to take a breather and looked around the room. All the other posters and people were gone except us? People were still there talking to us long after the session ended. People were interested in Embodied Development–how the body influences ambition, perception, confidence, inhibition and attention.

 

 

Presentation

In our presentation we asked people if they wanted to feel a somatic sense of self-awareness. Then we Rosasco-Mitchell SRCD picshared fundamental questions about development, for example: “Does embodiment play a role in development?”; “What would be different in the outcome if lesson plans included sensory self-awareness?”; and “What kind of sample lesson could teachers do for sensory self-awareness?” Flyers of the poster explained how embodiment influences behavior through habitual patterning of behavior. “Lesson Plans” with sensory awareness would inspire future applications of learned material. Finally we gave teachers a sample lesson in “How to Teach Sensory Self Awareness.” “Embodied Development” was a familiar and exciting concept for professionals in the Psychology, Development, and Neuroscience fields but how to feel it and teach it was new to most. Double click this link to see poster presented:Poster_Embodied Development _4-2.

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Child Development Teaching Institute Presentation

We have been accepted to present at the Teaching Institute for the Society of Research of Child Development (SRCD).  Teaching Institute is held at the preconference of SRCD Biennial Conference  2015 in Philadelphia.  Teaching Institute is designed for teachers of developmental courses of all levels wishing to develop strategies for engaging students, exploring new ideas, and update their knowledge with like-minded professionals.

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Announcement WTM Invited to Research Conference

Announcement: Wellness Through Movement Presents At

Society of Research Child Development (SRCD) Teaching Institute

We have been accepted to present at the Teaching Institute for the Society of Research of Child Development (SRCD).  Teaching Institute is held at the preconference of SRCD Biennial Conference 2015 in Philadelphia.  Teaching Institute is designed for teachers of developmental courses of all levels wishing to develop strategies for engaging students, exploring new ideas, and update their knowledge with like-minded professionals.

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Update: HomeBreath Video Animation Broadcast for School

Have you ever thought of an exciting new idea and was gun-ho on making it happen?  And once you were in the thick of it, it got even thicker with details, complications, technical challenges and phases unknown to man, at least in your own mind?  Well making a 12-minute video whiteboard animation = is like producing a major film for someone who is new to the film world.  The film is really funny and coming along but alas taking more time then expected.

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Whiteboard Animation Video Coming Soon

Thanks to the principal of Kohala Elementary, Danny Garcia,  Wellness Through Movement (WTM) has been requested to do a broadcast for the school to train students and teachers.  This is one way to build a bridge between the culture of the Department of Education and a higher quality of living from both for the mind and heart of our children.  Sponsors have helped us create a video to explain  the foundational lessons of the program for the whole school to view.

The whiteboard video will draw out cartoons as it “talks story”  to capture children’s attention, address Continue reading

Students Learn to Take Responsibility for Behavior

 

“…the majority were better equipped to take responsibility for their behavior.”

Article by Cherry Sanford

Elementary Teacher

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As an assistant in the Wellness Through Movement Program at Kohala Elementary this spring, I had the opportunity to witness evidence of progress in the children’s physical and emotional health and well being. While engaged in a variety of fun and enlivening movements, I observed children in the process of learning to listen to their own bodies and emotions.
After many years of teaching experience, I can easily see that elementary Continue reading

End of the Year Report

Class of 2014 K-2

Class of 2014 K-2

Wellness Through Movement Mentorship January 2014-May 2014 

 

BUILDING TOGETHER a WHOLE CHILD 

 

MAHALO TO the TEAM

Parents; Principal Garcia; Counselor Rosemae Watterson; Sponsors: First Hawaiian Bank and Community Member and Teachers Mel Rufo, Merrilee Carpenter and Bindi Wiernicki; Interns and assistants Andy Russell and Cherry Sanford

 

KOHALA ELEMENTARY PRINCIPAL, SCHOOL COUNSELOR AND PARENTS

Mahalo nui loa to parents of the WTM program for your attendance, correspondence, and outreach in the program.    Rose Mae Watterson, School Counselor thank you for your care and support to keep the program going.  We will miss you next year and say aloha in your new life of retirement.   Nothing would have happened with out over reaching to new horizons for his school, mahalo Principal Danny Garcia,  at Kohala Elementary School for all the extra hours and efforts put for to bring WTM into the Kohala Elementary school.  Your efforts to reach into the families or your children and go the extra mile to help the research project come to your school will not be wasted.  Parents are still corresponding to us about their process and research logistics are still developing with Vassar College.

 

FUNDERS and SPONSORS

▪   Private Community Members

▪   First Hawaiian Bank Continue reading

The Human GPS

The Human GPS for Learning

How Movement and Cognition Unite

 Thinking and reasoning are used to address learning in Education but rarely is the brain and body considered an operation of two hemispheres opposite and complementary. Arts, movement, and even (western) yoga classes are valuable “breathers” to thought and reason but to educate the foundation of how the human nervous system learns awareness in quality of movement must be united with cognition. WTM does so by looking at the integration of three functions:

1. Motor Patterns (different than motor skills) – the character of movement form as perception

2. Cognition – development and structure of thinking

3. Perception – when the is brain activated (by a pattern of sensation) and attempts to notice and process

To clarify the above definitions:

Movement patterns are sensations synergistically operating with the senses in action, specifically the sense of “proprioception.” Proprioception negotiates between senses, thoughts and actions trying to carry out intention.   Proprioception in this context is defined as the sense of motion between body parts and character of motion as a whole. Cognition is the development and structure of thinking.   And the attempt to notice and process thought negotiating with the senses is what is labeled perception.

The design of structure and function in motion displays communication between thoughts and senses.  Mindset can be read by “movement patterns.”  Movement, its efficiency and dysfunction of patterns give insight to this body-mind communication. Continue reading

Research Project Continues

Dear Supporters and School Administrators at Hawaii Dept. of Education,

Just to let you know your efforts in helping the research team with WTM has not gone to waste. And a special thanks to the support from First Hawaiian Bank in making this project reach schools in all the islands of Hawaii.

Vassar professors and students and the research team is still working on evaluation of the body’s aid to brain function (or what scientists call “embodied cognition”).  We are evaluating assessments and working on composing rationale.  We hope to have the research project presented at the Society for Research in Child Development conference in Philadelphia March 2015.

Children Get Organized Through Sensory Awareness

 

Want your Children to be Organized?

Be organized we have to beware of our surroundings, that includes stuff and space.   Outer surroundings and what is perceived is always relative to one self so beware of surroundings starts with being aware of one self.  Some children seem lost when put into situations to take care of themselves, cooperate with others, or find solutions to challenges.  Even playing children can lack emphatic cooperation skills.  This is all part of being organized.  Being organized and self-regulation takes self- awareness.  To be self-aware we have to be present with our actions and attitudes.  First step to awareness is SELF- INQUIRY and for children that means feeling the body.

 

Teaching Organization: Daily Routine of Self-Awareness and Preparation

Organization takes routine. Route always has two components, self and what is around us.  Reviewing steps from start and finish of each day sets up routine.  The first step is feeling oneself.   If children don’t remember put them in the physical position when they learned what ever was being taught.   Then physical position and action kindles recall.  This is also how to teach self-awareness (from the body to brain). Feeling sensation of the body will help develop recall and memory.  Memory is developed through organization and routine. To kindle memory recall sequences of actions and what was Continue reading

Parent Hour

photoKohala Elementary School Cafeteria

April 30, 2014

8:15 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Wednesday

Come and share. Come and learn about the exciting changes and challenges we have seen in your child. Share with us  what you have learned while your child has attended WTM and if there are any questions before we end the program.  Learn about the new ideas for WTM in the coming years.

ALL PARENTS AND TEACHERS ARE WELCOME
Wellness Through Movement is about teaching the whole child through the sensation of the body supports self-awareness, self-direction, communication, and social and emotional ease.

Thank you to our Sponsors of Community Members, First Hawaiian Bank, 21 Century Program, North Kohala Community Resource Center and Kohala Elementary School

Video Lesson for “Attention” Elementary Schools

Kohala Teachers inquire about a new way of  learning from the BODY-TO-THE-BRAIN.

Three teachers of the second and fifth grade classrooms Mel Rufo, Bindi Wiernicki, and Merrilee Carpenter got  tips from WTM how to improve grades, listening and respect.  Requests specifically focused  Listening.  Other requests included following directions, transition times, Responsiveness and self regulation so this video was produced: Getting Sensational Attention, a lesson for children in elementary schools.

 

 

 

 

Listening 4 BASIC Steps for the Physical

Listening 

Listening depends on what is going on in the back of the mind.   This internal dialogue of sensations  or both organic such as blood sugar (healthy meals), rest, and water or mental and emotional  such as curiosity, motivation, or inhibition.  The physical feeling nature of body in children talks  louder then “out there.”  (See free video called: Getting Sensational Attention)

Children may be able to hear us but can’t listen.  An adult may have a similar challenge when the internal dialogue of what he/she feels  (physically or emotionally) gets in the way of understanding what is being said. Researchers Alfred Tomatis and Christian Vold focus more on the problems of “listening” then “hearing.”  The brain gets a great deal of “silent traffic” from a matrix of metabolic processes (sensations in the body) that can get in the way of listening.  Could this be one reason our children can’t “hear” us?

Take care of the basics on listening first by taking care of the sensations of the body: 

TAKE CARE OF THE PHYSICAL FIRST

4 BASICS  TO IMPROVE LISTENING

Body-to-Brain Communication

  1. Drinks lots of water.  Sound simply? If you want your child to take better care of his/her self and their attitude have them drink water.  The brain is growing rapidly in a child and the brain “eats” water.  Drinking water makes “salt water,” an ionic charge assisting communication between thinking feeling, moving and learning.
  2. Is your child hungry and does he/she eat balance meals? Is the plate of food full a variety colors?  Serving a variety of foods will insure getting a balances meal with all the essential nutrients they need to think, grow and learn. These nutrients are from the basic food groups especially: vegetable, protein (meats or legume + grain), and grain. Eat sugar? Eating sugar wipes out the power of nutrients so try to only have on occasion, and not when sick. Can’t get kids to eat veggies? Blend veggies into smoothies with fruits, mix into grains chopped fine, or sneak them into a sandwich spread.  Surprisingly if just one food group is missing all other essential nutrients have a hard time getting absorbed into the body. Ideas for healthy snacks: eat food from the earth to the mouth (nuts, fruit, carrot, etc.).
  3. Rest and physical activity. For children rapidly growing and learning rest is essential. Children “download” information while sleeping.  Physical Activity (especially aerobic and joyful!) helps release pent up energy and physical tension. If children sit still (at computers) for too long their bodies could affect emotional health. Lack of movement can also make the mind “numb” to others. If a child is medicated or confined sitting still for too long the body-to-brain information Continue reading

Wanting Children to Listen: Parent Meeting

photoThank you to the over forty parents who attended the Waimea Elementary Wellness Through Movement Parent Hour this February. Parent’s main concern was getting their children to listen.  Learning how a child listen takes understanding how children  “feel more than think.”

Recognize the feeling nature (physical and emotional) behind  words to understand what  is heard  inside a child’s mind.  The the facial expression, body posture and emotion behind the word is what children hear, not the words.

Children look to parent to see if they are okay when they fall, in the same way they look at their parents reactions more then what they are saying.  If parents are upset children hear the attitude, not necessarily the word. The physical feeling in the body holds the intonation behind words.  This intonation explains what  children hear. Continue reading